The Week's Links: May 31, 2013

All the links posted on social networks this week:

  • The Difference Between Linear and Exponential Thinking 
  • A Brief History of Robot Birds 
  • James Victore: In The Particular Lies The Universal 
  • Benjamin Franklin's Phonetic Alphabet 
  • 12 Exceptionally Long or Extremely Special Words 
  • Michael Benson's Awe-Inspiring Views of the Solar System 
  • Every Day a Different Dish: Klari Reis' Petri Paintings 
  • The Strange Beauty of David Maisel's Aerial Photographs 
  • The Art of Staying Focused in a Distracting World 
  • Macoto Murayama's Intricate Blueprints of Flowers 
  • Take Up Computer Games, Not Crosswords, As You Age 
  • Ali, Marilyn, Jackie and Mr. TIME: The cover artist who helped define a magazine 
  • Michael Bierut On The New Philbrook Museum of Art Brand 
  • Creativity Top 5: Week of May 27, 2013 
  • 'Nanogardens' Sprout Up On The Surface Of A Penny 
  • “One can burn a diamond in air” 
  • How Stravinsky's Rite of Spring has shaped 100 years of music 
  • Qantas to Flyers: Ditch Your Kindles, Read Our Custom Books 
  • 2013 Logo Trends on LogoLounge.com 
  • Mary Meeker is Back With Her 2013 Internet Trends Report Slides 
  • The BBC unveils an experimental ‘Perceptive Radio’ that offers personalized content 
  • Meet the Man Who Sold a Month-Old App to Dropbox for $100M 
  • Kindle’s most-highlighted passages and the soul of the American reader 
  • Temple Grandin's Book Excerpt: How an Entirely New, Autistic Way of Thinking Powers Silicon Valley 
  • Bajofondo "Lluvia" 
  • The Curse of Reading and Forgetting 
  • Caro Emerald: Tangles, Transitions and Textures 
  • Transmedia Hollywood 3: Rethinking Creative Relations [Panel Videos] 
  • Scientists Just Recorded the Brightest Explosion We’ve Ever Seen 
  • How Much Do We Really Know About Your Tongue? 
  • Why Do We Laugh? 
  • Peeping in on the Process of Turning Caterpillar to Butterfly 
  • How Pixar and Psychology Helped Facebook Design Its Emoticons 
  • Should we put up with disruptive behavior at the theatre? 
  • Click Here If You Are You Missing Out 
  • A Bust of Richard III, 3D-Printed From a Scan of His Recently Exhumed Skull 
  • Old schooled: You never stop learning like a child 
  • The Life-Saving App That Sends Pictures of Your Heartbeat to Doctors 
  • Heart Attacks May Be Linked to Air Pollution 
  • You Actually Can Die of a Broken Heart 
  • Specially-Trained Honeybees Forage for Land Mines 
  • China Is Opening Around 100 Museums Every Year 
  • Heinrich Rohrer, Father of Nanotechnology, Dies at 79 
  • The Whitney Museum New Graphic Identity 
  • Dentists Discovered the Tooth-Saving Properties of Fluoride by Accident 
  • An Aging Mathematician Made a Major Dent in One of Math’s Oldest Problems 
  • Here's an idea, PBS Idea Channel is TED Talks from the fringe 
  • BBC abandons £100m digital project 
  • 15 of the Greatest Celebrity Commencement Speeches 
  • 24 Classic Books' Original Titles 
  • From Arrested Development to Dr. Who, How Binge Watching Is Changing Our Culture 
  • Insights From A Future Harvard Business School Case Study, Before It's Taught At Harvard 
  • Love this: Great Musicians on the Concerts That Inspired Them to Make Music 
  • Designing the new, fully responsive wired.co.uk article pages 
  • Reading List: 6 Stories for the Science-Fiction Newbie 
  • MIT TechTV: Communicating Science and Technology in the 21st Century 
  • Love this: Things Come Apart, 50 Disassembled Objects in 21,959 Individual Parts by Todd McLellan 
  • Amazing images: 2013 National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest 
  • The three types of specialist 
  • The modern history of swearing: Where all the dirtiest words come from 
  • The Economist explains: Why are your friends more popular than you? 
  • Are You Good In A Crisis? Test Your Lifesaving Skills With This New App 
  • Millennials Vs. 50+: The Brands They Love 
  • Big Corporations Are Buying Design Firms in Droves 
  • When Computer Games May Keep the Brain Nimble 
  • 15 Things You Should Give Up To Be Happy 
  • Mac OS graphic designer Susan Kare on icon design 
  • Responsive Tools For Web Designer & Developers 
  • Are smartphones ruining art? 
  • How Pixar and Psychology Helped Facebook Design Its Emoticons 
  • Dr. Dre, Jimmy Iovine to give $70 million to USC for new arts academy 
  • Tips and tricks for iPhoto for iOS 
  • Stephen King delays e-book in favor of print 

Recommended This Week: 

 

Antonio Ortiz

Antonio Ortiz has always been an autodidact with an eclectic array of interests. Fascinated with technology, advertising and culture he has forged a career that combines them all. In 1991 Antonio developed one of the very first websites to market the arts. It was text based, only available to computer scientists, and increased attendance to the Rutgers Arts Center where he had truly begun his professional career. Since then Antonio has been an early adopter and innovator merging technology and marketing with his passion for art, culture and entertainment. For a more in-depth look at those passions, visit SmarterCreativity.com.

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