The Week's Links: May 6, 2016

ALL THE LINKS POSTED ON SOCIAL NETWORKS THIS WEEK:

  • The Sooner You Expose A Baby To A Second Language, The Smarter They’ll Be owl.li/4niZ3X
  • When the Empire State Building Was Just an Architect's Sketch owl.li/4niWiz
  • ◉ Raising the Digital Generation: What Parents Need to Know About Digital Media and Learning owl.li/4nisT8
  • ◉ Recommended: The Year of Lear: Shakespeare in 1606 owl.li/4nisbv
  • Maya Angelou’s Beautiful Letter to Her Younger Self owl.li/4niR80
  • Life in the "digital now" owl.li/4niR0s
  • How Technology May Help Save the Rhino From Extinction owl.li/4niR6q
  • The Art Museum Underground owl.li/4niQZK
  • This Is Your Brain on Podcasts owl.li/4niR4C
  • 7 TED Talks to watch during breakfast owl.li/4niQXY
  • The 10 Greatest Films of All Time According to 846 Film Critics owl.li/4niR2b
  • Anna Deavere Smith on Discipline and How We Can Learn to Stop Letting Others Define You owl.li/4niR17
  • ◉ Paul Rand In His Own Words (And Animated) owl.li/4nisNb
  • ◉ Recommended: Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World owl.li/4nis9J
  • The leap second: Because our clocks are more accurate than the Earth owl.li/4niQUZ
  • Breathtaking Footage Of The World's Highest Waterfall owl.li/4niLV4
  • The real story behind Archimedes’ Eureka! - Armand D'Angour owl.li/4niPeo
  • An Ancient Philosophical Song Reconstructed and Played for the First Time in 1,000 Years owl.li/4niGsE
  • Findings from the Gut--New Insights into the Human Microbiome owl.li/4niPdo
  • Hear Oscar Wilde’s “The Happy Prince,” Performed by Orson Welles & Bing Crosby on Christmas Eve 1944 owl.li/4nirFQ
  • TED-Ed | Mysteries of Vernacular owl.li/4niPcc
  • Why Digital Money Hasn’t Killed Cash - The New Yorker owl.li/4niPb3
  • ◉ Feeling Sad Makes Us More Creative owl.li/4nisAS
  • Watch Animated Introductions to 25 Philosophers by The School of Life: From Plato to Kant and Foucault owl.li/4nirua
  • ◉ Recommended: The Man Who Invented Fiction: How Cervantes Ushered in the Modern World owl.li/4nis7q
  • Discover Harvard’s Collection of 2,500 Pigments: Preserving the World’s Rare, Wonderful Colors owl.li/4nirqw
  • The World According to Star Wars owl.li/4nifKj
  • List of most expensive domain names - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia owl.li/4nijLS
  • Beautiful aerial photography by Bernhard Edmaier owl.li/4nifHE
  • Ricky Jay, sleight of hand owl.li/4nifPO
  • The Psychology of Time and the Paradox of How Impulsivity and Self-Control Mediate Our Capacity for Presence owl.li/4nifse
  • ◉ Now Computers Can Tell When You're Bored -  smartercreativity.com/blog/2016/5/2/…
  • A trip to The Northernmost Town on Earth owl.li/4nifNw
  • The “Brain Dictionary”: Beautiful 3D Map Shows How Different Brain Areas Respond to Hearing Different Words owl.li/4nirCJ
  • Video footage from 1956 of the first American shopping mall owl.li/4nifME
  • ◉ Procrastination: What are you waiting for? owl.li/4nisuL
  • It May Soon Be a Lot Harder for the Law to Get Into Your Email owl.li/4nifpC
  • ◉ Recommended: Dark Territory: The Secret History of Cyber War owl.li/4nirSG
  • Annotated Volcano: A Spectacular View of Tenerife From the ISS owl.li/4nifoZ
  • The Guardian’s first VR project makes viewers experience the horrors of solitary confinement owl.li/4nhL9s
  • Making the Web Just a Second Faster Would Be a Big Deal owl.li/4nifom
  • Bruce Springsteen's Tribute To Prince Is A Lesson In Public Mourning owl.li/4nhKXs
  • The Crazy Thing Your Brain Does When You Sleep in a New Place owl.li/4nidZG
  • 10 National Geographic Photos That Explain Earth to Extraterrestrials owl.li/4nhKSp
  • Our 8 Favorite VR Experiences From the Tribeca Film Festival owl.li/4nifqO
  • ◉ Why are we so bored? - smartercreativity.com/blog/2016/5/1/…
  • A Twitter Bot Is Generating Fantastic New Words | The Creators Project owl.li/4nhQrG
  • Bloomberg EIC: Automation is ‘crucial to the future of journalism’ owl.li/4nhLlf
  • ◉ All Creative Work Builds On What Came Before owl.li/4nislA
  • Picasso piece tangled in tug-of-war between dealer, billionaire owl.li/4nhx2d
  • Why Facebook Is Killing It—Even When Nobody Else Is owl.li/4nhwS8
  • Choreographer Édouard Lock shakes up one of the most familiar pieces of music ever made owl.li/4nhvNY
  • What Happens To Your Brain When It Hears A Story owl.li/4nhwR7
  • TV Stations Agree to Sell Enough Spectrum to Meet F.C.C.’s Goal owl.li/4nhvMU
  • The Harvard Professor Who Is Digitizing Scent owl.li/4nhwPA
  • The Forgotten Father of the Information Age owl.li/4nhvpc
  • Who Will Debunk The Debunkers? owl.li/4nhwO3
  • The Evolutionary Argument Against Reality | Quanta Magazine owl.li/4nhx3G
  • What’s Really Killing Digital Media: The Tyranny Of The Impression owl.li/4nhw5A
  • A trip to The Northernmost Town on Earth owl.li/4ng70D
  • 2016 Audubon Photography Awards owl.li/4ng6Tq
  • Airlander 10: World’s largest aircraft “weeks” away from first UK test flight owl.li/4neW15
  • How to read the genome and build a human being owl.li/4nhvoq
  • Six maps that will make you rethink the world owl.li/4ng3jQ
  • Who Will Debunk The Debunkers? owl.li/4ndr8B
  • Putting Work in Its Place owl.li/4nfaOe
  • On Shakespeare owl.li/4ncsAY
  • Breathtaking Photos Capture Cuba's Legendary Ballerinas Dancing In The Streets owl.li/4neWTK
  • How Physics Will Change—and Change the World—in 100 Years — NOVA Next | PBS owl.li/4neWy9
  • The Legend of Prince's Special Custom-Font Symbol Floppy Disks owl.li/4ncjGG
  • What Arabic Type Reveals About How Experts See The World owl.li/4ncjCT
  • The Answer to This One Interview Question Speaks Volumes owl.li/4nceU9
  • Ideacide: The Perils of Self-Censoring (And How You Can Stop It) owl.li/4ncgAc
  • BMW Redesigns The Wheelchair For High-Speed Paralympians owl.li/4nbWIY
  • 3-D Printed Cheese Is Just Another Step Toward The High-Tech Future Of Food owl.li/4ncf21
  • Inside OpenAI, Elon Musk’s Wild Plan to Set Artificial Intelligence Free owl.li/4nbWqR
  • These Are The 10 Best Sustainable Buildings Of 2016 owl.li/4nceZW
  • Walter Cronkite in the computerized home office of 2001 (1967) owl.li/4ncrXR
  • This Quake-Proof Japanese Building Uses A Net Of Rods To Prevent Shaking owl.li/4nceWW

Antonio Ortiz

Antonio Ortiz has always been an autodidact with an eclectic array of interests. Fascinated with technology, advertising and culture he has forged a career that combines them all. In 1991 Antonio developed one of the very first websites to market the arts. It was text based, only available to computer scientists, and increased attendance to the Rutgers Arts Center where he had truly begun his professional career. Since then Antonio has been an early adopter and innovator merging technology and marketing with his passion for art, culture and entertainment. For a more in-depth look at those passions, visit SmarterCreativity.com.

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Now Computers Can Tell When You're Bored

Scientific American

Boredom manifests itself in more than yawns and glazed eyes. Subtle body cues called noninstrumental movements—squirming, scratching, shifting—also give away a person's mental state. Like teachers and other public speakers, machines can now also pick up on these telltale signs of restlessness. A new study reveals that when computer users tune in to on-screen material, their fidgeting lessens—and algorithms can use that information to discern attentiveness in real time.
To measure engagement, psychobiologist Harry Witchel of Brighton and Sussex Medical School in England and his colleagues outfitted 27 participants with motion-tracking markers that a computer's visual system could follow. The participants then read digital excerpts from a novel by Mark Haddon, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, and from the European Banking Authority's regulations. Based on motion in the head, torso and legs, the computer could tell when a person had mentally checked out. In fact, an analysis of the cumulative movements revealed that when people read from the novel, they fidgeted nearly 50 percent less than when reading the banking guidelines.

 

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Antonio Ortiz

Antonio Ortiz has always been an autodidact with an eclectic array of interests. Fascinated with technology, advertising and culture he has forged a career that combines them all. In 1991 Antonio developed one of the very first websites to market the arts. It was text based, only available to computer scientists, and increased attendance to the Rutgers Arts Center where he had truly begun his professional career. Since then Antonio has been an early adopter and innovator merging technology and marketing with his passion for art, culture and entertainment. For a more in-depth look at those passions, visit SmarterCreativity.com.

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Why are we so bored?

We live in a world of constant entertainment – but is too much stimulation boring?

Although we seem to live in a varied and exciting world with a wealth of entertainment at our fingertips, this is actually the problem. Many of these amusements are obtained in remarkably similar ways – via our fingers. We spend much of our work life now tapping away at our keyboard. We then look for stimulation (watching movies, reading books, catching the news, interacting with friends) via the internet or our phone, which means more tapping. On average we spend six to seven hours in front of our phone, tablet, computer and TV screens every day.

All this is simply becoming boring. Instead of performing varied activities that engage different neural systems (sport, knitting, painting, cooking, etc) to relieve our tedium, we fall back on the same screen-tapping schema for much of our day. The irony is that while our mobile devices should allow us to fill every moment, our means of obtaining that entertainment has become so repetitive and routine that it’s a source of boredom in itself.

 

/Source

Antonio Ortiz

Antonio Ortiz has always been an autodidact with an eclectic array of interests. Fascinated with technology, advertising and culture he has forged a career that combines them all. In 1991 Antonio developed one of the very first websites to market the arts. It was text based, only available to computer scientists, and increased attendance to the Rutgers Arts Center where he had truly begun his professional career. Since then Antonio has been an early adopter and innovator merging technology and marketing with his passion for art, culture and entertainment. For a more in-depth look at those passions, visit SmarterCreativity.com.

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The Week's Links: April 29, 2016

ALL THE LINKS POSTED ON SOCIAL NETWORKS THIS WEEK:

Antonio Ortiz

Antonio Ortiz has always been an autodidact with an eclectic array of interests. Fascinated with technology, advertising and culture he has forged a career that combines them all. In 1991 Antonio developed one of the very first websites to market the arts. It was text based, only available to computer scientists, and increased attendance to the Rutgers Arts Center where he had truly begun his professional career. Since then Antonio has been an early adopter and innovator merging technology and marketing with his passion for art, culture and entertainment. For a more in-depth look at those passions, visit SmarterCreativity.com.

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