Thinking About The Future Of The Internet

On the Wall Street Journal David Gelernter and  Eric Freeman discuss the evolution of how we consume the internet: 

We go to the Internet for many reasons, but most often to discover what’s new. We have had libraries for millennia, but never before have we had a crystal ball that can tell us what is happening everywhere right now. Nor have we ever had screens, from room-sized to wrist-sized, that can show us high-resolution, constantly flowing streams of information. 
Today, time-based structures, flowing data—in streams, feeds, blogs—increasingly dominate the Web. Flow has become the basic organizing principle of the cybersphere. The trend is widely understood, but its implications aren’t.

There is also the other side of the equation, not just consumption but production. Anyone working producing content to distribute on the internet is aware of how rapid this flow really is. 


Antonio Ortiz

Antonio Ortiz has always been an autodidact with an eclectic array of interests. Fascinated with technology, advertising and culture he has forged a career that combines them all. In 1991 Antonio developed one of the very first websites to market the arts. It was text based, only available to computer scientists, and increased attendance to the Rutgers Arts Center where he had truly begun his professional career. Since then Antonio has been an early adopter and innovator merging technology and marketing with his passion for art, culture and entertainment. For a more in-depth look at those passions, visit

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How "oldschool" graphics worked

In part 1, the limitations of color on older 1980's computers and game consoles such as the Nintendo Entertainment System and the Commodore 64. The artwork of "The Mill" by Oliver Lindau. The artwork of "Halo J." by Steven Day.

In this episode Apple II and Atari 2600 graphics modes. 

"Paper," Another Spectacular Spot for Honda

PES's new film for Honda. Dozens of animators and illustrators, thousands of original drawings, and four months of work. Everything in the film is done by hand and shot in camera.

Check out behind the scenes of PES's latest film for Honda. 

Another spot to add to the list of great Honda spots

Everything is a Remix Remastered

I'm a fan of Kirby Ferguson and have shared his work before. Here is a remastered version of his series Everything is a Remix, that is worth revisiting.