The Week's Links: September 6, 2013

All the links posted on social networks this week: 

  • Remembering the Spark That Ignited a Creative Fire 
  • From Collaborative Coding to Wedding Invitations: GitHub Is Going Mainstream 
  • 10 Simple Postures That Boost Performance 
  • An Oral History Of Apple Design: 1992 
  • 3 inspiring TEDx Talks on happiness at work 
  • FBI’s “Vault” Web Site Reveals Declassified Files on Hemingway, Einstein, Marilyn & Other Icons 
  • 5,000-Year-Old Gaming Pieces Found In Turkey 
  • Top 10 Fastest Supercomputers In The World 
  • The New York Times (quietly) drops the F-bomb 
  • Australian archive says 1996 pop art-inspired version of Shakespeare was first movie created for the internet 
  • Should We Teach Literature Students How To Analyze Texts Algorithmically? 
  • Inside The Mind Of A Chef 
  • Pumpkin Spice Latte, the Drink That Almost Wasn’t 
  • Marissa Mayer's notes on the new Yahoo logo: Geeking Out on the Logo 
  • A New App Tells A Neverending Bedtime Story, Of A Kid's Own Design 
  • Very cool: Concert Master - A new way to choose a classical concert 
  • Big Think: The 7 Most Popular Ideas of Summer 2013 
  • A Big Bach Download: The Complete Organ Works for Free 
  • LOUD 
  • Recommended: Managing Humans: Biting and Humorous Tales of a Software Engineering Manager 
  • Study: To The Human Brain, Me Is We 
  • Interesting: E-Books Could Be The Future Of Social Media 
  • The future of handwriting 
  • Ancient Pottery Fragments Show That Prehistoric Humans Used Spices Too 
  • The Science Behind Honey's Eternal Shelf Life 
  • 10 Things We've Learned About Learning 
  • Think You're Doing a Good Job? Not If the Algorithms Say You're Not 
  • A WWII Propaganda Campaign Popularized the Myth That Carrots Help You See in the Dark 
  • Slurred Lines: Great Cocktail Moments in Famous Literature 
  • How the Coffee Cup Sleeve Was Invented 
  • These Ocean Waves Look Like Liquid Sculptures 
  • What Digitization Will Do for the Future of Museums 
  • A Little Music Training In Childhood Goes A Long Way 
  • See the Greatest Architecture in 36 Different European Cities in This One, Gorgeous Time-Lapse 
  • Kids Trust Nice People Over Smart People 
  • Creativity Top 5: Week of September 2, 2013 
  • Recommended: The Way We're Working Isn't Working: The Four Forgotten Needs That Energize Great Performance 
  • Getty Just Made 4,600 Incredible Images Free to Download and Use 
  • Hide And Seek Might Be Good for Kids’ Brains 
  • These Complex, Beautiful Board Game Pieces Are 5,000 Years Old 
  • To Exercise More, Sleep More First 
  • Computer Programmer Creates Beautiful Watercolor Paintings With Code 
  • Boston Children’s Hospital Once Relied on the Opera to Power X-Rays 
  • Just A Little Meditation Causes Brain-Wave Changes 
  • Haters May Have a Natural Disposition to Hate 
  • The Arecibo Observatory: Beyond The Big Dreams 
  • Recommended: Start with Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action 
  • New Element 115 May Finally Be Added to the Periodic Table 
  • Guilt Is Contagious 
  • Why Do We Cry When We’re Happy? 
  • Museum Day Live! 9/28/13 Download a ticket for free admission to over 1,500 museums nationwide 
  • The Insane and Exciting Future of the Bionic Body 
  • What Your Favorite Book Looks Like in Colors 
  • Alfred Hitchcock’s Seven-Minute Editing Master Class 
  • How An Arcane Coding Method From 1970s Banking Software Could Save The Sanity Of Web Developers Everywhere 
  • How To Find Inspiration In The Age Of Information Overload 
  • Give Yourself Vertigo Plunging Into Hitchcock's Cinematic Obsessions 
  • The 60-Second Guide To How Flashcards Actually Work 
  • What Causes Nightmares? 
  • 10 Things We've Learned About Learning 
  • How Do You Rebrand a Country? A look at Japan’s attempt to call itself “cool” 
  • Vladimir Nabokov Creates a Hand-Drawn Map of James Joyce’s Ulysses 
  • Fantastic: Every Movie Poster that Saul Bass Ever Made 
  • How To Build a High-Performing Digital Team - Perry Hewitt 
  • Unblocked: A Guide To Making Things People Love (Part 1) 
  • A Look at How Agency Compensation Has Changed 
  • Stunning Paper Birds from Diana Beltrán Herrera 
  • Airborne: Jose the Amazing photos by Chris Arnade 
  • Engine: The History of a Concept, From 14th-Century Poetry to Google 
  • 40 maps that explain the world 
  • Here's What Really Happens When You Extend a Deadline - Heidi Grant Halvorson 
  • Amazing: Incredibly Detailed Close-Ups of Van Gogh’s Masterpieces 
  • Ha!: Scientists determine the formula for perfect melted cheese on toast 
  • Reuters Top 100 Global Innovators 
  • 50 Science Fiction/Fantasy Films That Everyone Should See 
  • The Writing Tools of 20 Famous Authors 
  • 10 Hollywood Hits Inspired By Magazine and Newspaper Articles 
  • How This Brain Scientist Used Video Game Tech To Break New Ground 
  • Digital magazines: how popular are they? 
  • Edinburgh international book festival sees rise of author-as-performer 
  • Just A Little Meditation Causes Brain-Wave Changes 
  • Pre-Raphaelite mural discovered in William Morris's Red House 
  • Communicating Across Species: Jonathon Keats' Honeybee Ballet 
  • The Plight of the Honeybee 
  • For the Met, Opera History Lives in a Newark Parking Lot 
  • Design Better And Faster With Rapid Prototyping 
  • The Surprising Complexity of Lobster Prices 

 

 

Antonio Ortiz

Antonio Ortiz has always been an autodidact with an eclectic array of interests. Fascinated with technology, advertising and culture he has forged a career that combines them all. In 1991 Antonio developed one of the very first websites to market the arts. It was text based, only available to computer scientists, and increased attendance to the Rutgers Arts Center where he had truly begun his professional career. Since then Antonio has been an early adopter and innovator merging technology and marketing with his passion for art, culture and entertainment. For a more in-depth look at those passions, visit SmarterCreativity.com.

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