The Week's Links: March 8, 2013

All the links posted on social networks this week:

  • Snakes in a Frame: Mark Laita's Stunning Photographs of Slithering Beasts 
  • Biodesign: When Life is Not Only the Subject of Art, But the Medium Too 
  • The Year's Most Outstanding Science Visualizations 
  • Say Goodbye To Video Stores, Mailmen, Pennies... 
  • 10 Vintage Menus That Are a Feast for the Eyes, If Not the Stomach 
  • No Salt, No Problem: One Woman's Life-or-Death Quest to Make "Bland" Food Delicious 
  • The PBS Renaissance, Mario Bros. and Surrealist Art 
  • How Does McCormick Pick the Top Flavors of the Year? 
  • Ockham Never Really Had a Razor 
  • Opera Fans Have an Advantage in Chemistry Class 
  • What Rock-Paper-Scissors Can Tell Us About Decision Making 
  • UNICEF and Droga5 Launch 2013 'Tap Project' With a Facebook Push 
  • Amazing Astrophotography Lets You See Nebulae in 3D 
  • Too Little Sleep Can Really Mess Our Bodies Up 
  • This Is Your Brain on Movies 
  • Geneticists Try to Figure Out When the Illiad Was Published 
  • With News Feed Overhaul, Facebook Delivers Your 'Personalized Newspaper' 
  • Paola Antonelli Teaches Stephen Colbert A Thing Or Two About Applied Design 
  • Why Are Our Brains Wrinkly? 
  • MIT Technology Review performs an Autopsy of a Dead Social Network, Friendster 
  • Superb chart on the legal trade-mark-ability of a name. From 1950. 
  • Brand New: Logo Reductions for Screen Use 
  • Your Brain On Fiction 
  • The Power of Structured Procrastination 
  • Facebook’s Redesign Hopes to Keep Users Engaged - NYTimes.com 
  • Creativity Top 5: Week of March 4 
  • Respect Yourself and Take Back Control of Your Calendar 
  • How to Keep the Ideas Flowing When You’re Put in Charge 
  • My 10 Essential Email Habits: zenhabits 
  • Classic worth revisiting: 50 Questions That Will Free Your Mind 
  • How To Use Google Like Sherlock Holmes 
  • The Wildly Ambitious Quest to Build a Mind-Controlled Exoskeleton by 2014 
  • The Real Work Of Writing: Elizabeth Gilbert Takes On Philip Roth 
  • Why a one-room West Virginia library runs a $20,000 Cisco router 
  • TIME Turns 90: All You Need to Know About Modern History in 90 Cover Stories 
  • The Annotated Wisdom of Louis C.K. 
  • Why Bilinguals Are Smarter 
  • Artificial intelligence: Can we teach computers what “truth” means? 
  • New research suggests some of our aesthetic preferences emerge by the time we’re eight months old. 
  • 50 unseen Rudyard Kipling poems discovered 
  • McSweeneys: Nate Silver Offers Up a Statistical Analysis of Your Failing Relationship. 
  • Study: Volunteering May Improve Cardiovascular Health 
  • From Mat Honan, who suffered a devastating hack last year: What To Do After You've Been Hacked 
  • A Simple Trick for Tripling People's Charitable Donations 
  • Why is Coffee Good For You? Here Are 7 Reasons 
  • "'Smart' simply means you're ready to learn." and other quotes from TED 2013 
  • Vulnerability (A Mini TED Remix) [Update] 
  • Google launches Art Talks on Google+ starting tomorrow at MoMA and then the National Gallery later this month. 
  • Why Great Ideas Get Rejected: From TEDxOU 
  • Break Your Addiction to Meetings - Elizabeth Grace Saunders 
  • Why are digital textbooks not taking off? 
  • Where would we be without Pantone? 
  • What 15 Years Of Computer Screen Evolution Looks Like 
  • Is the arts subscription model dying, or are we selling subscriptions the wrong way? 
  • PBS 2013 Online Film Festival Starts Today 
  • Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: The author's taciturn responses to an 1899 version of the Proust questionnaire. 
  • Beautiful: Intricate Miniature Tape, Thread, and Toothbrush Sculptures 
  • More Insights on Sharpening Your Creative Mind 
  • Ballet In Advertising 
  • 4 surprising lessons about education from data collected around the world 
  • What We Talk About When We Talk About "Social" - Nilofer Merchant 
  • When Brain Damage Unlocks The Genius Within 
  • What did the 16th century minds of Shakespeare and Galileo have in common, and what set them apart? 
  • Iconic Artists at Work: Watch Rare Videos of Picasso, Matisse, Kandinsky, Renoir, Monet and More 
  • The End Of 9-5 Made Life More Complicated; Here's How To Take Control Again 
  • Five Inspired Ideas Emerging From TED2013 
  • Debug Yourself: Rethinking Mistakes And How They Affect Your Work 
  • Write E-Mails That People Won't Ignore - Bryan A. Garner 
  • The Hunt for a New, Copyright-Free Happy Birthday Song 
  • The Holodeck Is Real: How does fiction get us to treat fake things as real? 
  • Greater Thoughts About Writing 
  • The Most Beautiful Nature GIFs on the Web 
  • Time to change passwords: Evernote hacked - SlashGear 
  • Fresh From TED: A Mind-Blowing App That Could Remake Mobile Retail: Try Things On, Virtually 
  • Respect Yourself and Take Back Control of Your Calendar 
  • Death To Core Competency: Lessons From Nike, Apple, Netflix 
  • Teachers As "Persuaders": An Interview With Daniel Pink - Classroom Q&A With Larry Ferlazzo 
  • Amy Sherman-Palladino on Making "Bunheads" The Most Accurate Ballet Show Ever 
  • Study: Hearing Music as Beautiful Is a Learned Trait 
  • 10 Essential Quotes for Writers 
  • Margrét Pála on teaching kids to be resilient 
  • Researchers Find That Dolphins Call Each Other By 'Name' 
  • Helicopter Branding: Why It’s Bad And How To Avoid It 

Recommended This Week: 

Antonio Ortiz

Antonio Ortiz has always been an autodidact with an eclectic array of interests. Fascinated with technology, advertising and culture he has forged a career that combines them all. In 1991 Antonio developed one of the very first websites to market the arts. It was text based, only available to computer scientists, and increased attendance to the Rutgers Arts Center where he had truly begun his professional career. Since then Antonio has been an early adopter and innovator merging technology and marketing with his passion for art, culture and entertainment. For a more in-depth look at those passions, visit SmarterCreativity.com.

◉ Permalink