The Week's Links: March 15, 2013

All the links posted on social networks this week:

  • So cool: Disorienting Portraits of People Walking In A Tilted New York City 
  • Drunk Texts from Famous Authors. Enough said. 
  • Dancers In Slow Motion 
  • I'm Not Your Consumer: How Research Misses The Human Behind The Demographic 
  • Brilliant idea, can't wait to try it: Hack the Met - Metropolitan Museum of Art Tour 
  • Met buys a David for $840: Sharp-eyed curators spot that sketch is an artist’s original, rather than a copy 
  • A guided hands-on with the NYT's first design overhaul since 2006, set to go live this fall 
  • Is Your User Content Online Legally Yours? 
  • Spectacular: Smithsonian Magazine's 2012 Photo Contest 
  • Creativity Top 5: Week of March 11, 2013 
  • Our brains, and how they're not as simple as we think 
  • James Dean In Ballet Class 
  • Watch: A Music Video For Typography Lovers 
  • If You’re Busy, You’re Doing Something Wrong: The Surprisingly Relaxed Lives of Elite Achievers 
  • Can limitations make you more creative? Q&A with artist Phil Hansen 
  • A Book Is Born 
  • Ogilvy & Mather Chief MIles Young Is Trying to Reinvent the Troubled Agency 
  • How emoji conquered the world: The story of the smiley face from the man who invented it 
  • Sharks Have Social Networks, Learn From Friends 
  • UCLA Film School professor Howard Suber explains how you can be a better storyteller 
  • What entrepreneurs can learn from artists 
  • What's Next? What's Now? 
  • The Big-Data Interview: Making Sense of the New World Order 
  • Add to the list of recently launched podcasts you should check out: The Gently Mad Podcast 
  • icons times: the day's headlines as icons 
  • The Best 1,000 Movies Ever Made According to The New York Times 
  • Art In The Era Of The Internet: The Impact of Kickstarter, Creative Commons & Creators Project 
  • BRANDING 101: What Building a Brand Means Today 
  • Such a great story: Why I Hacked Donkey Kong for My Daughter 
  • A first look at the upcoming redesign: Introducing A New Article Design —NYTimes.com 
  • New ‘Subway Libraries’ Encourages Commuters To Read On-The-Go 
  • Wanna Play? Computer Gamers Help Push Frontier Of Brain Research 
  • Player-Centric Design: The UX of The Room 
  • Why it's so hard to kids to learn their colors--and a trick that might help. 
  • Google's Art Project Launches Art Talk with The Museum of Modern Art 
  • Curious about this: Art Copy&Code, A series of experiments to re-imagine advertising 
  • A look at the The Rite of Spring ballet, not the music, the dance. 
  • Fish: The Best App/Essay/Manifesto I've Seen In Years 
  • WP Magazine, the Education Issue: After years of crouching, arts ed is raising its hand again 
  • Useful: Meaningful Transitions - Motion Graphics in the User Interface 
  • Andrew Anker: Always be humble 
  • Download Hundreds of Free Art Catalogs from The Metropolitan Museum of Art 
  • FYI: 100+ frequently used digital marketing acronyms 
  • The Magic of Doing One Thing at a Time - Tony Schwartz 
  • Debug Yourself: Rethinking Mistakes And How They Affect Your Work 
  • On Getting Paid (And Knowing Your Worth) — Freelance Life 
  • Pop Deflated: The Banal Celebrity Tweet Elevated To Art 
  • How to Write a Novel: 10 Steps — A Writer’s Life 
  • How to Give a Meaningful "Thank You" - Mark Goulston 
  • What Does A Creative Director Do Exactly? And Is Justin Timberlake Qualified? 
  • How simple ideas lead to scientific discoveries 
  • This Story Stinks: How online comments influence our interpretation of a story 
  • 50 Disruptive Companies 2013: MIT Technology Review 
  • The Ten Principles of 3D Printing 
  • Why Doodling in 3D is the Future 
  • A Rare Glimpse Into The Building Of New York City’s Subway 
  • Did Benjamin Franklin Invent Daylight Savings Time? 
  • Free: The Guggenheim Puts 65 Modern Art Books Online 
  • Life stranger than fiction: The Professor, the Bikini Model and the Suitcase Full of Trouble -NYTimes.com 
  • Interesting: How we go about adding new fonts to Typekit 
  • A Loog At Advertising Analytics 2.0 
  • WebKit for Developers by Paul Irish 
  • Rodent Mind Meld: Scientists Wire Two Rats' Brains Together 
  • How To Create A Science Prodigy 
  • 10 Mesmerizing Animated GIFs of Balanchine Ballets 
  • Trusting your instincts really does work, say scientists. You'll be right 90% of the time 
  • Upcoming Web Design Events 
  • From Gangnam Style to the Harlem Shake, Why We Just Can’t Resist a Dance Craze 
  • Video: This Stretchable Battery Could Power the Next Generation of Wearable Gadgets 
  • Mapping How the Brain Thinks 
  • How Does McCormick Pick the Top Flavors of the Year? 

Recommended This Week: 

Antonio Ortiz

Antonio Ortiz has always been an autodidact with an eclectic array of interests. Fascinated with technology, advertising and culture he has forged a career that combines them all. In 1991 Antonio developed one of the very first websites to market the arts. It was text based, only available to computer scientists, and increased attendance to the Rutgers Arts Center where he had truly begun his professional career. Since then Antonio has been an early adopter and innovator merging technology and marketing with his passion for art, culture and entertainment. For a more in-depth look at those passions, visit SmarterCreativity.com.

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