The Week's Links: February 8, 2013

All the links posted on social networks this week:

  • 20 Words We Owe to William Shakespeare 
  • Billboards to Advertise the Awesomeness of Science Pop Up in Vancouver 
  • Scientists Discover Dung Beetles Use The Milky Way For GPS 
  • 15 Colorful Entries From Mrs. Byrne's Dictionary of Unusual, Obscure, and Preposterous Words 
  • The big list of 100 tools, tips and tricks to work more efficiently online 
  • What would a New York Times for the youngs look like? 
  • Curious about this: Design lessons for programmers, curated by top designers 
  • Eight UX Design Trends for 2013 
  • Metamorphosis: How a poster becomes a stamp 
  • Can you identify a brand by their buttons: The Button Test 
  • As Pride and Prejudice Turns 200, Read Jane Austen’s Manuscripts Online 
  • Tony Kushner: Does Theater Still Matter? 
  • MIT Learning Creative Learning: A course for designers, technologists, and educators interested in creative learning 
  • Neil Gaiman Launches New Crowdsourced Storytelling Project (Sponsored by the New BlackBerry) 
  • Brain Tricks: This Is How Your Brain Works 
  • Etch a Sketch: Andre Cassagnes 1926-2013 
  • Critical Thinking: A Field Guide In 6 Short Films 
  • Interesting: The best places across the U.S. ranked by Foursquare 
  • Amazing: 102 Spectacular Nonfiction Stories from 2012 
  • How Does a Researcher's Idea Become an Innovation? 
  • VIDEO: See a Thought Move Through a Living Fish's Brain 
  • Beatboxing, as Seen Through Scientific Images 
  • On Reporting Annually 
  • Some Microbes Are So Resilient They Can Ride Hurricanes 
  • Room For Literature 
  • The four key features that characterize Flow, or what 10000 hours of practice gets you 
  • New X-Ray Technology To Reveal Secrets Beneath a Rembrandt Masterpiece 
  • Tim Burton’s The World of Stainboy: Watch the Complete Animated Series 
  • One of my favorite writers: Neil Gaiman Drops Knowledge 
  • 10 words invented by authors 
  • Case study for the fantastic transmedia experience Hunted's 'Byzantium Tests' 
  • Maira Kalman On The Power Of Lists, Maps And Organizing 
  • PBS Arts: Off Book, Exploring Cutting Edge Art - The Complete First Series 
  • A Tasty Slice of Geek History: PBS's "Silicon Valley" Premieres Tonight 
  • A thrilling look at 'Shakespeare Uncovered' 
  • The Practical Effect of Making Arts Education a National Priority
  • Kids should learn programming as well as reading and writing 
  • Eight Brilliant Minds on the Future of Online Education 
  • Essays from High Schoolers Who Know Nothing About Richard III Except for the Thing About His Bones 
  • Gershwin Plays Gershwin: The Piano Version of ‘Rhapsody in Blue,’ 1925 
  • Indus civilization food: How scientists are figuring out what curry was like 4,500 years ago. 
  • Creativity Top 5: Super Bowl Edition 
  • 10 places where anyone can learn to code 
  • 10 goals that could change your life 
  • What Twitter Really Looks Like, In Real Time 
  • Jad Abumrad: How Did Radiolab Happen? Gut Churn 
  • 51 Inspiring Quotes About Design 
  • How to Deal with Crushing Feedback on Your Creative Work 
  • 7 Common Words With Little-Known Relatives
  • Henry Miller's Productivity Commandments 
  • The White House Reveals A Redesigned Electronic Medical Record 
  • How Oreo Got That Twitter Ad Up So Fast 
  • Meet “Father Philanthropy”: America’s Most Prolific and Unlikely Master Art Forger 
  • The Best Fictional Libraries in Pop Culture 
  • The Greatest Dance Number Ever Filmed 
  • Why did men stop wearing high heels? 
  • Lessons from the Facebook Mobile Website Team 
  • 3 Subtle Ways To Shift Your Attitude From Can't-Do To Can-Do 
  • 'Pride And Prejudice' Turns 200 
  • The History of Rocket Science 
  • Open university: Joi Ito plans a radical reinvention of MIT's Media Lab 
  • How Memory Works: 10 Things Most People Get Wrong 
  • Too hot, too cold? What Does It Mean to Be Comfortable? 
  • Etch A Sketch creator André Cassagnes dies 
  • How To Develop Strong Time-Management Habits, Even If You've Failed In The Past 
  • Top 10 Good Tech Habits Everyone Should Have 
  • Love this spot: The Grammys: The World is Listening 
  • Nate Silver Picks the Super Bowl! 
  • Tim Ferriss: 11 Tricks for Perfect Sleep 
  • Are discount ticket buyers more discriminating? Enjoying themselves more? 
  • Report finds fundamental flaws in many nonprofits' fundraising 
  • Beware of Reactionary Workflow 
  • You Can Already Code - You Just Don’t Know It Yet 
  • Look At This Musician's Brain In An MRI Scanner 
  • The Artist Who Made a Career Out of Forgery - Dressed as a Priest 
  • Bad Writing Advice From Famous Authors 
  • John Hodgman’s Advice for Writers: The Competition is Insane, and Persistence Trumps Talent 
  • Flag Secrets: 5 International Flags with Surprising Stories 
  • Jose Mujica: The world's 'poorest' president 
  • Are the arts trading in happiness? If so, what kind? 
  • The secrets of Grand Central Terminal train station - interactive 
  • The Architectural League of New York: A Centennial Sketchbook for Grand Central Terminal 

Recommended This Week: 

Antonio Ortiz

Antonio Ortiz has always been an autodidact with an eclectic array of interests. Fascinated with technology, advertising and culture he has forged a career that combines them all. In 1991 Antonio developed one of the very first websites to market the arts. It was text based, only available to computer scientists, and increased attendance to the Rutgers Arts Center where he had truly begun his professional career. Since then Antonio has been an early adopter and innovator merging technology and marketing with his passion for art, culture and entertainment. For a more in-depth look at those passions, visit SmarterCreativity.com.

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