The Week's Links: November 8, 2013

All the links posted on social networks this week:   

  • Seven Tips From Ernest Hemingway on How to Write Fiction 
  • Public Libraries Make Digital Magazines Accessible to All 
  • Do We Want the World to End? Is Santa Like Wrestling? & Other Relevant Questions 
  • Mary Shelley’s Handwritten Manuscripts of Frankenstein Now Online for the First Time 
  • This Playful Robot Will Teach A 5-Year-Old To Code 
  • The 30-Hour Work Week Is Here (If You Want It) 
  • The Myth of 'I'm Bad at Math' 
  • So great: People Make New York City Subway Conductors’ Days With Silly Signs 
  • 11 Colors You've Probably Never Heard Of 
  • How the Egyptian Pyramids Were Built: A New Theory in 3D Animation 
  • Myth and Creativity: Stepping onto Platform 9 3/4 
  • Creativity Top 5: Week of November 4, 2013 
  • 10 Figures of Speech Illustrated by Monty Python: Paradiastole, Epanorthosis, Syncatabasis & More 
  • Recommended: Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life 
  • Where Have All the Geniuses Gone? 
  • The Power of Concentration & Mindfulness 
  • The Decline of Wikipedia: Even As More People Than Ever Rely on It, Fewer People Create It 
  • Should live theatre be shown in cinemas? 
  • Can Art Teach Patience? 
  • Researchers report people are more likely to behave in a morality-minded manner earlier in the day. 
  • There’s one key difference between kids who excel at math and those who don’t 
  • Inside The Hunt For Dark Matter 
  • Phantom Phone Vibrations: So Common They've Changed Our Brains 
  • TEDx Talks on paper: Artists visualize the world's ideas in 5 fascinating drawings 
  • Royal Shakespeare Company: The Design of Richard II 
  • Silent & Sound Shakespeare: Watch the Very First Film Adaptations of the Bard (1899-1936) 
  • Recommended: The Collaborative Habit: Life Lessons for Working Together 
  • Social Connection Makes a Better Brain 
  • Useful Media vs. Entertaining Media 
  • Ex-Facebooker Gifts the Social Network's Data Platform to the World 
  • Bringing Videogames to Film Festivals, and Rich Storytelling to Games 
  • Neuroscientists Discover that Dendritic Spikes Enhance the Brain’s Computing Power 
  • Google Channels Pixar to Change Storytelling as We Know It 
  • The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: Why Paper Still Beats Screens 
  • 25 Amazing Food Infographics, Drawn From 49,733 Recipes 
  • The Unlikely Network at the Core of Your Brain's Internet 
  • The Science Of A Great Subway Map 
  • What Is the Exactly Perfect Time to Drink Your Coffee? 
  • Alain de Botton: Art for Life's Sake 
  • First Children Are Smarter—but Why? 
  • Terrifying: Pianist Maria João Pires panics as she realises the orchestra has started the wrong concerto… 
  • Recommended: The War of Art 
  • The Science Of Productivity 
  • The Man Who Would Teach Machines to Think 
  • Study: Why We Evolved to Love Music 
  • The Personal Television Revolution Is Horrifying — And Brilliant 
  • Global forum of museum directors to meet at the Met in New York 
  • 8 Ways Television Is Influencing Theater 
  • Free: The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Guggenheim Offer 474 Free Art Books Online 
  • 12 Female CTOs You Should Know - and Follow on Twitter! 
  • 15 years ago, Congress kept Mickey Mouse out of the public domain. Will they do it again? 
  • Oxford University Press and the Making of a Book 
  • Recommended: Out of Our Minds: Learning to be Creative 
  • Top 400 fundraisers: 13 arts and culture groups make the list 
  • A Year Inside The Australian Ballet: Episode 9 - A 50th Birthday 
  • Important New Theory Explains Where Old Memories Go 
  • Brains Sweep Themselves Clean Of Toxins During Sleep 
  • Is it fair to review first night ballets? 
  • The Battle of Ideas: are we still able to listen to music properly? 
  • Developing new operas is an art in itself 
  • A History of Genius 
  • Ten thousand costumes and counting: Australia's theatrical wardrobe king 
  • You're Not As Open As You Think You Are: A New Perspective for Possibility 
  • Why Are Hundreds of Harvard Students Studying Ancient Chinese Philosophy 
  • How The Economy Works According To The World’s Best Investor, And What It Means For You 
  • Interactive article- NSA files decoded: Edward Snowden's surveillance revelations explained, theguardian 
  • Which is More Important, the Question or the Answer? 
  • Why We Make Bad Decisions 
  • 5 Surprising, Science-Backed Ways To Get Smarter Today 
  • We’re all creative until we learn — or are taught — how not to be. 
  • Brilliant: Annotation Tuesday! Gay Talese and “Frank Sinatra Has a Cold” – Nieman Storyboard 
  • Is This the Opera of the Future? 
  • The 50 Greatest Breakthroughs Since the Wheel 
  • Taxis: Who decided they should be yellow? 
  • What the Best Decision Makers Do - Harvard Business Review 
  • A Year Inside The Australian Ballet: Episode 9 - A 50th Birthday 
  • Infecting An Audience: Why Great Stories Spread 
  • An "All You Can Eat" College Degree Could Be The Future Of Higher Education 
 

Antonio Ortiz

Antonio Ortiz has always been an autodidact with an eclectic array of interests. Fascinated with technology, advertising and culture he has forged a career that combines them all. In 1991 Antonio developed one of the very first websites to market the arts. It was text based, only available to computer scientists, and increased attendance to the Rutgers Arts Center where he had truly begun his professional career. Since then Antonio has been an early adopter and innovator merging technology and marketing with his passion for art, culture and entertainment. For a more in-depth look at those passions, visit SmarterCreativity.com.

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