The Week's Links: November 1, 2013

All the links posted on social networks this week:   

  • The Decline of Wikipedia: Even As More People Than Ever Rely on It, Fewer People Create It | MIT Technology Review 
  • One Year Later, The Most Promising iPad Magazine Looks Back (And Forward) 
  • Why An Arts Nonprofit Is Developing Web Dashboards 
  • 50 Books to Inspire Artists of All Kinds 
  • A Brief History Of Coffeemakers, 1600-Present 
  • How Do You Know What You Think You Know? 
  • The value of zero-priced software 
  • Automate Your Responsive Images With Mobify.js 
  • Is Ad Avoidance a Problem?: The New Yorker 
  • The Psychology of Online Comments: The New Yorker 
  • A Year Inside The Australian Ballet: Episode 8 - The corps de ballet 
  • Bento - Learn how to code 
  • These Proto-GIFs of the 19th Century Put Today's GIFs to Shame 
  • Creativity Top 5: Week of October 28, 2013 
  • 101 Objects that Made America: Smithsonian Magazine 
  • Recommended: Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore: A Novel 
  • The History of Halloween Snacks and Foods 
  • Neil Blumenthal of Warby Parker on a Culture of Communication 
  • Revisit Orson Welles’ Iconic ‘War of the Worlds’ Broadcast That Aired 75 Years Ago Today 
  • How Calvin and Hobbes Inspired a Generation 
  • Top 10 Clever Google Search Tricks 
  • The Orchestra 
  • The Power of Personal Time Off 
  • A Day of Grace with Boston Ballet 
  • Recommended: Company 
  • Carving Culture: Sculptural Masterpieces Made from Old Books 
  • We Might Soon Know What Ancient Greek Music Actually Sounded Like 
  • 7 Data Viz Sites to Inspire Your Creative Eye 
  • If the Web Preceded Print: The New Golden Age of Book Design and Creativity on Paper 
  • Aging Well: Keeping Blood Sugar Low May Protect Memory 
  • Understand Music 
  • Chris Jones: Storytelling is magic 
  • Recommended: Machine Man 
  • 5 Unanswered Questions That Will Keep Physicists Awake at Night 
  • Multitalented Creative People: Developing Multiple Talents 
  • An epilogue: 21 Things I learnt from Midsummer Night’s Dreaming with the RSC 
  • Why French Kids Don't have ADHD 
  • How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses 
  • New Seamus Heaney poem published 
  • Google Unveils Tools to Access Web From Repressive Countries 
  • 8 Big Lessons From 30 Years Of Breakthrough Consumer Innovation 
  • Knowledge is a Polyglot: The Future of Global Language 
  • Give A Damn, Damn It: Reddit Co-founder Alexis Ohanian 
  • The Neuroscience Behind How Sleep Cleans Your Brain 
  • George Balanchine and NYC Ballet 
  • Recommended: Jennifer Government 
  • How Superstition Works 
  • Why People Mistake Good Deals for Rip-Offs 
  • What Are the 10 Greatest Inventions of Our Time?: Scientific American 
  • Fantastic behind the scenes look at a busy restaurant: 22 Hours in Balthazar -NYTimes.com 
  • Why Q was illegal in Turkey until last month 
  • How much can an extra hour's sleep change you? 
  • The Best Illustrations From All Your Favorite Children's Books 
  • 5 Surprising, Science-Backed Ways To Get Smarter Today 
  • The Genius Who Invented Brunch 
  • The New, Old Way to Tell Stories: With Input From the Audience 
  • The Met's youngest composer takes us behind the scenes of the first internet-era opera: Nico Muhly 
  • The National Theatre at 50: Michael Billington's view from the stalls 
  • The National Theatre: A standing ovation for a great British institution on its 50th 
  • How Silk Road, the eBay of Illegal Drugs, Came Undone : The New Yorker 
  • This Audio-Only Video Game Has Nothing “Video” About It 
  • This Artist Learned To Code By Building A Website Every Day For 180 Days 
  • Watch: A 2-Minute Animation Of Stephen Hawking's Big Ideas 
  • Coding Is An Art--Software People Should Learn "Art Thinking" 
  • Now More Than Ever, You Need This Illustrated Guide To Bad Arguments, Faulty Logic, And Silly Rhetoric 
  • Decade In Design: The Biggest Events Of 2004 
  • BBC News - Disney develops way to 'feel' touchscreen images 
  • The 5 Common Characteristics of Ideas That Spread 
  • The Winners Of Fast Company's 2013 Innovation By Design Awards 
  • The 50 Scariest Books of All Time 
  • Douglas Coupland: A possibly unsexy date with yourself 
 

Antonio Ortiz

Antonio Ortiz has always been an autodidact with an eclectic array of interests. Fascinated with technology, advertising and culture he has forged a career that combines them all. In 1991 Antonio developed one of the very first websites to market the arts. It was text based, only available to computer scientists, and increased attendance to the Rutgers Arts Center where he had truly begun his professional career. Since then Antonio has been an early adopter and innovator merging technology and marketing with his passion for art, culture and entertainment. For a more in-depth look at those passions, visit SmarterCreativity.com.

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