The Week's Links: January 4, 2013

All the links posted on social networks this week and at the end of last year:

  • What People (Mistakenly) Believe About How Memory Works 
  • Amazing what you can learn from a pickpocket: The Spectacular Thefts of Apollo Robbins, Pickpocket 
  • Ray Kurzweil's Top 5 Reasons to Be Optimistic for 2013 
  • Innovation Is About Arguing, Not Brainstorming. Here's How To Argue Productively 
  • The Top Five Career Regrets - Daniel Gulati 
  • What Turned Jaron Lanier Against the Web? 
  • Big Data Is Great, but Don’t Forget Intuition 
  • Karen May of Google, on Conquering Fears of Giving Feedback 
  • Sydney Opera House and YouTube to live stream events 
  • Tiredness
  • How Joe Biden Accidentally Helped Us All E-Mail in Private 
  • NY Times Culture Editor Jonathan Landman to Leave Paper 
  • Progressive jpegs: a new best practice 
  • Must read: How We Made Snow Fall. A behind the scenes look at that great work of journalism and web development. 
  • Creativity Top 5: Most Creative Advertisers Of 2012 
  • 99% Invisible: The Brief and Tumultuous Life of the New UC Logo 
  • Music therapy offers hope for Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s 
  • Alain de Botton On Envy
  • The Magic of Doing One Thing at a Time - Tony Schwartz 
  • The Genius Who Invented Brunch 
  • 28 Brilliant Tips for Living Life 
  • Alfred Hitchcock Recalls Working with Salvador Dali on Spellbound 
  • How We’ll Learn in 2013 
  • Why Do We Blink So Frequently? 
  • Six Innovators to Watch in 2013 
  • Adomania
  • A History of Sequins from King Tut to the King of Pop 
  • 52 weeks, 52 places to visit on 2013 
  • Architecture to Watch in 2013 
  • Seven Must-See Art and Science Exhibitions of 2013 
  • There Are Roughly Roughly 2 Million Bubbles in 1 Glass of Champagne 
  • This Nostalgic Private Collection Has 1,713 Photos of Old-Fashioned Cans, Jars and Clippings 
  • Letters of Note: Best of 2012 
  • A Cheat Sheet for All You New Kindle (And Other Ereader) Owners 
  • Life's Work 2012: HBR Interviews 10 Intriguing People 
  • 2012: Science Fiction Dreams That Came True 
  • Is This Hans Christian Andersen’s First Fairy Tale? 
  • One of the World’s Oldest Bibles Is Now Online 
  • Even NASA Doesn’t Know Exactly What Causes Motion Sickness (But There Is a Way to Avoid It) 
  • 36 Bizarre Things Ceremonially Dropped on New Year’s Eve 
  • The worst ideas of 2012 
  • The Amazing Things You Can Build With a $25 Computer 
  • The 10 Tech Terms to Know in 2013 
  • China Passes Law Requiring People Identify Selves Online 
  • The Best of Brain Pickings 2012 
  • 2012: The Year In Graphics - NYTimes.com 
  • Linus Torvalds: The King of Geeks (And Dad of 3) 
  • Are We Born With a Sense of Fairness?
  • Breakdown Graphic: How the Kindle Paperwhite Works 
  • Watch Portrait of an Artist: Jackson Pollock, the 1987 Documentary Narrated by Melvyn Bragg 
  • Birds may get emotional over birdsong 
  • Bumblebees Aren’t Picky Eaters, But They Do Like Variety 
  • Liftoff, like you’ve never seen it before. 
  • Ray Kurzweil: Memorization is For Robots. People Learn By Doing. 
  • MIT discovers a new state of matter, a new kind of magnetism 
  • Inside the Mind of Google's Greatest Idea Man You've Never Heard Of, John Hanke 
  • Big Idea 2013: Charging More for Good Ideas than Bad Ones 
  • Exercise and the Ever-Smarter Human Brain 
  • Ballet isn’t rocket science, but the two aren’t mutually exclusive, either 
  • The best of TED-Ed: The art of the metaphor 
  • Why Legos Are So Expensive — And So Popular : Planet Money 
  • Game Theory: Considering Video Games as Ballet 
  • Game Theory: Challenging the Industry 
  • Game Theory: A Playwright on the Art of Video Games 
  • Hisham Matar reads "Shakespeare's Memory" by Jorge Luis Borges 
  • A Simple Guide To 4 Complex Learning Theories 
  • Ballet isn’t rocket science, but the two aren’t mutually exclusive, either 
  • 50 Free Resources That Will Improve Your Writing Skills 
  • Just in case you missed it: The Requisite End-Of-Year Lists 2012 
  • Which Computer Is Smarter, Watson Or Deep Blue? 
  • Asparagus Prevents Hangovers, Incredibly Useful Study Finds 
  • From ‘Anna Karenina,’ lessons for the ballet world 
  • The Recycled Orchestra: Paraguayan Youth Play Mozart with Instruments Cleverly Made Out of Trash 
  • Overcoming Procrastination, Money Problems, Self-Doubt & Other Creative Distractions 
  • The Requisite End-Of-Year Lists 2012
  • Asteroid Miners Prepare For A Lucrative Future 
  • Beautiful: Wood Animals, Sculptures Made Out of Discarded Furniture 
  • The One Conversational Tool That Will Make You Better At Absolutely Everything 
  • The Science of Creativity in 2013: Looking Back to Look Forward 
  • Improv 101: The Key to Thinking Fearlessly 
  • 20 Free Must-Have Scripts for InDesign Users 
  • CSS Baseline: The Good, The Bad And The Ugly 
  • A List Of The Best Annual Tech Startup Events In Europe In 2013 
  • How To Get Paid What You're Worth & Other Negotiation Tips 
  • Is Perfectionism Holding You Back? 
  • The Rhythms of Work vs The Rhythms of Creative Labor 
  • Honey bees trained to stick out their tongues for science 
  • Derek Powazek - I’m Not The Product, But I Play One On The Internet 
  • The best of TED-Ed: Rethinking thinking 
  • Seth's Blog: Doing what you love (but maybe you can't get paid for it) 
  • Common Misconceptions About Intelligence III: IQ Tests Are Unreliable 
  • The Last Newsweek Cover Has a Hashtag on It 
  • The Neuroscience Lessons of Freestyle Rap 
  • HTML5 Inches Closer to the Finish Line | Webmonkey 
  • Epic: James Bond: 50 Years of Main Title Design — Art of the Title 
  • Honey bees trained to stick out their tongues for science 
  • Encyclopedia of Life: A primer in primary colors 
  • Seth's Blog: Ridiculous is the new remarkable 
  • The Grateful Brain 
  • Original Creators: Filmmaking Genius Orson Welles 
  • Who Made That Subway Signage? 
  • Celebrity Statistician Nate Silver Fields Questions from Data Wizards at Google 
  • 18 Animations of Classic Literary Works: From Plato and Shakespeare, to Kafka, Hemingway and Gaiman 
  • So great: What To Do When The Bus Doesn't Come And You Want To Scream. An Experiment 
  • Trend alert: small internet publications 
  • The New York Times Compendium 
  • Hacking the Human Brain: The Next Domain of Warfare 
  • This Man Makes Data Look Beautiful 
  • The Macintosh That Saved Apple 
  • Researchers show that memories reside in specific brain cells - MIT 
  • 6 Simple Rituals To Reach Your Potential Every Day 

Antonio Ortiz

Antonio Ortiz has always been an autodidact with an eclectic array of interests. Fascinated with technology, advertising and culture he has forged a career that combines them all. In 1991 Antonio developed one of the very first websites to market the arts. It was text based, only available to computer scientists, and increased attendance to the Rutgers Arts Center where he had truly begun his professional career. Since then Antonio has been an early adopter and innovator merging technology and marketing with his passion for art, culture and entertainment. For a more in-depth look at those passions, visit SmarterCreativity.com.

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