The Week's Links: January 11, 2013

All the links posted on social networks this week:

  • What's inside Play-Doh 
  • What is a Higgs Boson? 
  • 5 Strategies for Tackling Tough Conversations 
  • The Dieline's Top 100 Posts of 2012. The best in packaging. 
  • Why are we so content with umbrellas? They desperately need redesigning 
  • Study: people consistently believe that they're never going to change 
  • New Year's Resolutions Are A Lousy Substitute To Caring 
  • 10 TED Talks that involve unusual instruments 
  • Next Draft is one of my favorite daily things, this is how @davepell curates the news. 
  • 8 TED Talks about the making of movie magic 
  • Starting An Open-Source Project 
  • Why You Don't Like Donating To Charities That Offer Thank You Gifts 
  • Seth Godin's Blog: Decisions 
  • Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Albert Einstein 
  • Tony Schwartz: The Myths of the Overworked Creative 
  • 7 Stunning Mineral Formations 
  • A Selection of 19-Year-Old Isaac Newton’s Secret Sins 
  • The Value Of Culture
  • The Surprisingly Manly History of Hot Cocoa 
  • How I Got My EGOT: 12 Lessons Mel Brooks Learned Making TV, Albums, Movies, and Theater 
  • Ha! Rational Or Ridiculous? A Book Of 100 Brilliantly Absurd Inventions 
  • 3.2 Million Ink Dots + 210 Hours = Hero 
  • New Series: Wired's Weekly Picks of Stunning Architecture 
  • Louis Vuitton Promotes New Collection With Paper Dolls 
  • What entrepreneurs can learn from artists 
  • Saul Bass’ Advice for Designers: Learn to Draw, and Create Beauty Even If Nobody Else Cares 
  • On Reading Weird Books in Public 
  • Michael Chabon On Entertainment 
  • Martin Scorsese Presents The Blues: A Film Tribute to America’s Great Musical Tradition 
  • Creativity Top 5 
  • Could video simulcasts at your local theater save the arts, or sink them? 
  • On Stephen Hawking's Birthday, Vader and Being More Machine Than Human 
  • Big Hair, No Sitting, Velcroed To Your Pillow: What It's Like To Live Weightlessly 
  • The Title Design of Saul Bass ( A Visual History Lesson ) 
  • Introducing the First Search Engine for Math And Science Equations 
  • National Endowment for the Arts Announces Funding Guidelines Available for Fiscal Year 2014 Grants for Arts Projects 
  • We Used To Actually Set Food on Fire to Figure Out How Many Calories It Had 
  • Babies Start Learning Language in the Womb 
  • Do Humans Have a Biological Stopwatch? 
  • Keith Yamashita: Greatness And Creativity 
  • Physicists Find That “Absolute Zero” May Not Be Quite So Absolute 
  • The future arrives over and over and over again, CES from 1967 to 2012 
  • Christoph Niemann Illustrates A Talk With Maurice Sendak 
  • Cindy Gallop: 10 Women I'll Be Watching in Adland in 2013 
  • Address Is Approximate: Storytelling & Technology in wonderful animation 
  • How Twitter Gets In The Way Of Knowledge 
  • Gorgeous: The Mississippi Delta seen from 700km above the surface of the Earth. 
  • So Good: Brand new covers for five of George Orwell's works feature in a new series published today by Penguin 
  • James Brown Gives You Dancing Lessons: From The Funky Chicken to The Boogaloo 
  • Iamus: Is this the 21st century's answer to Mozart? 
  • Seven publishing trends that will define 2013 
  • Top 20 Thinkers in Social TV and Second Screen 
  • H.P. Lovecraft’s Advice to Young Writers 
  • True: What We Learned In 2012 - Rob Schwartz 
  • Chronicling Ballet’s Pain and Passion 
  • The Absolute Beginner's Guide to Arduino 
  • 5 Strategies for Tackling Tough Conversations 
  • The top 10 classic fears in literature 
  • Fascinating: The Mysterious Disappearance Of The Russian Crown Jewels 
  • Essential Creative Advice From Joss Whedon, Carrie Brownstein, Jim Stengel And 13 Others 
  • 3 Principles For The Future Of Gaming, From A Google Game Designer 
  • So good: Maurice Sendak’s Emotional Last Interview with NPR’s Terry Gross, Animated by Cristoph Niemann 
  • The Quest For A Copyright-Free Happy Birthday Song 
  • Biggest intelligence test exposes the limits of IQ 
  • 2012 In Review: 50 Wonderful Things From The Year In Pop Culture 
  • 12 Historical Speeches Nobody Ever Heard 
  • How the Calorie Content of Food is Determined 
  • Ray Kurzweil's Top 5 Reasons to Be Optimistic for 2013 
  • Amazing what you can learn from a pickpocket: The Spectacular Thefts of Apollo Robbins, Pickpocket 

Recommended This Week: 

Antonio Ortiz

Antonio Ortiz has always been an autodidact with an eclectic array of interests. Fascinated with technology, advertising and culture he has forged a career that combines them all. In 1991 Antonio developed one of the very first websites to market the arts. It was text based, only available to computer scientists, and increased attendance to the Rutgers Arts Center where he had truly begun his professional career. Since then Antonio has been an early adopter and innovator merging technology and marketing with his passion for art, culture and entertainment. For a more in-depth look at those passions, visit SmarterCreativity.com.

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