The Week's Links: December 9, 2012

All the links posted on social networks this week:

  • Gift Ideas For Smarter Creativity
  • How encryption works in your web browser. 
  • Which Is Greater, The Number Of Sand Grains On Earth Or Stars In The Sky? 
  • Experimentation Is The New Planning 
  • Past philanthropists: How giving has evolved 
  • Boston Public Library treasures abound on Flickr 
  • The Best (and Worst) of Mobile Connectivity by Pew Internet 
  • The Science Behind Those Obama Campaign E-Mails 
  • A Triumph of the Comic-Book Novel by Gabriel Winslow-Yost 
  • Making Advertising Work In A Responsive World 
  • The wide open future of the art museum: Q&A with William Noel 
  • On Great Novels with Bad Endings 
  • García Márquez Among the Best-Selling Writers in China 
  • 11 Weirdly Spelled Words—And How They Got That Way 
  • Why Is it Impossible to Stop Thinking, to Render the Mind a Complete Blank? 
  • Dzine: "Listen, I Have This Crazy Idea…" 
  • Rare Dictionaries May Reach $1 Million in NYC Next Week 
  • The Beauty Of Slow Motion
  • 4 Lessons to Learn from Charles and Ray Eames 
  • MoMA Adds Video Games to Its Collection 
  • The 14 Video Games MoMA has acquired for their permanent collection. 
  • PBS Arts: Off Book - Episode 8: Video Games 
  • Journey’s Soundtrack Nominated for a Grammy. The first video game score ever given the honor. 
  • How to welcome and nurture the poets and painters of the future 
  • Search engine for the full text and descriptions of every Calvin and Hobbes script 
  • Atari Teenage Riot: The Inside Story Of Pong And The Video Game Industry's Big Bang 
  • Alexis Madrigal: Why Startups Need To Solve Real Problems Again 
  • Why people spend so many hours stitching footage into YouTube supercuts. 
  • Lead-proton collisions yield surprising results, may be producing a new type of matter. 
  • After ‘The End’: 10 Memorable End-Credit Scenes 
  • Best statistics question ever 
  • How we read, not what we read, may be contributing to our information overload 
  • Old Media, New Tricks. Can The New York Times' R&D Lab tech-heads help save the battered news brand? 
  • AIGA: Identifying red flags to avoid trouble clients 
  • The Real Problem With Neuroscience Today
  • General-Purpose AI is the Logical Endpoint for Task Management Software 
  • How Computers Understand Speech—in 7 Steps 
  • Exhibition Explores The Invisible Art Of Perfume Making 
  • Brand identity style guides from around the world 
  • Chris Poole: Our identity is like a diamond, multi-faceted 
  • Leonard Bernstein’s First “Young People’s Concert” at Carnegie Hall Asks, “What Does Music Mean?” 
  • Newly Developed Live Nanoscale Imaging Technique Promises Improvement in Li-ion Batteries 
  • 9 Leadership Myths--& How to Overcome Them 
  • Human Brain Is Wired for Harmony 
  • Coming soon to a theatre near you: Demand-based ticket pricing 
  • Edwin Land invented not just instant photography but the culture that came with it 
  • Bad Robot Meets MIT Media Lab: In Conversation With JJ Abrams 
  • frog design releases Collective Action Toolkit- A resource for change makers 
  • With Pirate Cinema, Cory Doctorow Grows His Young Hacker Army 
  • Mary Meeker releases stunning data on the state of the Internet 
  • UN internet regulation treaty talks begin in Dubai 
  • Technology Is Useless If It Doesn't Address A Human Need 
  • PBS Arts: Off Book - Episode 7: Etsy Art & Culture 
  • Designers: here's your master list of Lorem Ipsum alternatives 
  • 10 Best Commercials of 2012: The Year's Most Entertaining, Intriguing and Beautiful Spots 
  • What Neuroscience Really Teaches Us, and What It Doesn't 
  • Can Money Change the Brain? 
  • Fascinating: Theresa Christy On The Ups and Downs of Making Elevators Go 
  • How to Power Through Any Demanding Task 
  • Beautiful: Woodchip Animal Sculptures 
  • He sent the first text message 20 years ago, and forever changed the world 
  • 9 More Gorgeous European Libraries 
  • Creativity Top 5: December 3, 2012
  • Google’s Searches for UnGoogleable Information to Make Mobile Search Smarter 
  • The 7 Greatest Engineering Innovations Of 2012 
  • Simple scents make you part with most cash 
  • Ultrasound Video Captures Fetuses Yawning 
  • 8 TED Talks on the importance of listening  Also: 
  • 5 Moments in Sauce History That Changed The Way We Eat 
  • Does Creativity Come With A Price? New Insight On Creatives And Mental Illness 
  • Elmore Leonard: 10 Rules
  • University Of California Rebrands Itself With Surfer Charm 
  • Maker's Row: A Comprehensive Database Of American Manufacturers 
  • Have we, like, lost our conviction? You know? 
  • Original Creator: Hip-Hop And Electro Pioneer Afrika Bambaataa 
  • Imagination Illustrated: Muppets Creator Jim Henson's Never-Before-Seen Journals and Sketches 
  • How Memory Works: 10 Things Most People Get Wrong 
  • Infographic: History's most influential people, ranked by Wikipedia reach 
  • M.I.T. Lab Hatches Ideas, and Companies, by the Dozens 
  • Lincoln, Shakespeare, and Tony Kushner 
  • Nine Dangerous Things You Learned In School 
  • The Autism Advantage, fascinating article about a company that only hires people with autism. 
  • The Harvard Classics: A Free, Digital Collection 

Recommended This Week: 

If you are looking for gift ideas, check out Gift Ideas For Smarter Creativity.

Antonio Ortiz

Antonio Ortiz has always been an autodidact with an eclectic array of interests. Fascinated with technology, advertising and culture he has forged a career that combines them all. In 1991 Antonio developed one of the very first websites to market the arts. It was text based, only available to computer scientists, and increased attendance to the Rutgers Arts Center where he had truly begun his professional career. Since then Antonio has been an early adopter and innovator merging technology and marketing with his passion for art, culture and entertainment. For a more in-depth look at those passions, visit SmarterCreativity.com.

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