The Week's Links: December 16, 2012

All the links posted on social networks this week:

  • The Making of XOXO, plus all the session videos. 
  • The Pleasures of Imperfection 
  • Love Of Spicy Food Is Built Into Your Personality 
  • 30 Great Moments In The History Of Robots 
  • What Schools Can Learn From Google, IDEO, and Pixar 
  • TED's Ads Worth Spreading Report (PDF) 
  • The Top 10 Smartest Cities In North America 
  • How to Train an Animator, by Walt Disney 
  • What storytelling does to our brains 
  • The sad, surprising story of Google Reader.  
  • Gift Ideas For Smarter Creativity 
  • The Design of a Site Meant to be Read 
  • Gestures as a New Dimension in Mobile Design 
  • Behind The App: The Making of Twitterrific 5 
  • Why your computer is getting cheaper but your broadband bill isn’t 
  • A Year Inside The Australian Ballet: Episode 9 - A 50th Birthday 
  • PBS series 'Shakespeare Uncovered' to dig deep into Bard's plays 
  • Researchers Create the Most Complex Virtual Brain So Far 
  • Listen to the BBC's radio version of Asimov's 'Foundation' trilogy online 
  • It's Your Life: The Holstee Manifesto Lifecycle Video 
  • Start your day with Smithsonian Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum's Object of the Day. 
  • Start your day with History.com's What Happened Today in History 
  • Woody Allen answers 12 unusual questions 
  • A Year Inside The Australian Ballet: Episode 8 - The corps de ballet 
  • Amazing: Birds of a Feather 
  • Remarkable Macro Photographs of Ice Structures and Snowflakes 
  • Aaron Dignan: How to Use Games to Excel at Life and Work 
  • Ten things you never knew about Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol 
  • Why Leaders Should Constantly Reiterate What's Important 
  • Loren Brichter: Designs on the future of iOS apps 
  • How To Win At Self-Distribution If You're Not Louis C.K.: A Case Study For Creators And Marketers 
  • The Orchestra
  • Have the Courage to Be Direct - Anthony Tjan 
  • MIT Media Lab's Leah Buechley on falling in love with technology 
  • Cavemen Were Much Better At Illustrating Animals Than Artists Today 
  • Collecting the World's Collections of Small Oddities One Day at a Time 
  • Why Do We Hiccup? And Other Scientific Mysteries—Seen Through the Eyes of Artists 
  • The Insane Amount of Biodiversity in One Cubic Foot 
  • Ambient Noise Spurs Creativity 
  • Bacterial Life Abounds in Antarctic Lake, Cut Off From the World for 2,800 Years 
  • The First Use of OMG Was in a 1917 Letter to Winston Churchill 
  • For Adults, TV Can Serve the Same Role as an Imaginary Friend 
  • Understand Music
  • Creativity Top 5
  • Made By Hand: The Knife Maker 
  • Amazing Modernist Sandcastles Sculpted by Calvin Seibert 
  • There Are More Brainteasers About Crossing Rivers Than You Ever Imagined 
  • 20 Game-Changing Technology Trends That Will Create Both Disruption and Opportunity on a Global Level 
  • The Paper That Changed Type Design 
  • Beautiful: 20 Inspiring Typography Posters 
  • Kafka’s Nightmare Tale, ‘A Country Doctor,’ Told in Award-Winning Japanese Animation 
  • The Four Fears Blocking You from Great Ideas 
  • World's Largest Brain Simulation Has 2.5 Million Neurons 
  • A great new tumblr: Photoshop Secrets 
  • New research suggests specially selected nocturnal odors can inspire creativity. 
  • Give A Damn, Damn It: Reddit Co-founder Alexis Ohanian 
  • Learning by Design: It's Not What You Know, But How You Think 
  • What Neuroscience Really Teaches Us, and What It Doesn't 
  • The Neuroscience of Creativity 
  • Made By Hand: The Distiller. A short-film series on hand-made things. 
  • Raymond Chandler, "The Simple Art of Murder"(1950) 
  • New Cadbury chocolate doesn't melt, even at 104 degrees 
  • The Code Side Of Color 
  • 7 Basic Types of Stories: Which One Is Your Brand Telling? 
  • The Best Ads And Creative Talent Of The Last 50 Years, According to Britain's D&AD 
  • How encryption works in your web browser. 

Recommended this week:

Antonio Ortiz

Antonio Ortiz has always been an autodidact with an eclectic array of interests. Fascinated with technology, advertising and culture he has forged a career that combines them all. In 1991 Antonio developed one of the very first websites to market the arts. It was text based, only available to computer scientists, and increased attendance to the Rutgers Arts Center where he had truly begun his professional career. Since then Antonio has been an early adopter and innovator merging technology and marketing with his passion for art, culture and entertainment. For a more in-depth look at those passions, visit SmarterCreativity.com.

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